Indonesia: In-Company Trainers to foster Vocational Education and Training (VET)

Upskilling and reskilling
05.10.2021
In-Company Trainers (AdA, training of trainers) are an important part of Vocational Education and Training (VET). In Indonesia, there is the In-CT Basic Training Course and the In-CT Master Training Course. Swisscontact through S4C has already had 35 In-Company Trainers trained to foster dual VET. 

At the opening of the In-Company Master Trainer Course on Sept. 27, Minister of Industry Agus Kartasasmita stated that “In-Company Trainer” is key to ensure effective skill and knowledge transfer to the interns. This will help companies find qualified employees, whilst the schools will benefit from better access to private sector cooperation.

“Personally, I did not just learn from the training material, but also from so many different styles of teaching that the Senior Masters shown us, from the methodology, how to do a presentation, how to interact, how to manage the group dynamics, how to keep the happy moment, and so forth which are priceless skills that we gain along with all the training materials."

Christine Effendy, Asian Management Consulting

The Indonesian government, IHK Trier, GIZ/TVET System Reform, and Skills for Competitiveness (S4C) support this training. The Indonesian Ambassadors for Germany and Switzerland, Swiss Ambassador for Indonesia, and Country Director of GIZ Indonesia, ASEAN and Timor-Leste joined the minister in making opening speeches.
 

“This was the first time such training is conducted fully in Indonesian language by Indonesian Senior Master Trainers and the materials were fully adapted to Indonesian context from Regional Standard for In-CT in ASEAN Countries as well as German standards.”

Saesario Indrawan, Swisscontact S4C

Indonesia
Initial vocational education and training, Upskilling and reskilling
Skills for Competitiveness (S4C)
Indonesia has charted impressive economic growth since overcoming the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s. It has become the largest economy in the ASEAN community with a GDP per capita of USD 3’603 in 2016. Today, Indonesia is a key player on the global stage as the world’s 4th most populous nation, the world’s 10th largest economy and a member of the G-20. Poverty has been halved since 1999 to 10.9% in 2016 (World Bank, 2017).